‘Did we go through a good process?’ or ‘Did we achieve a good result?’

Dr Michael E Porter was quoted in May 2015

Opening Session Speaker Dr. Michael E. Porter Discusses Current State, Future Directions of Value-Based Health Care

http://am.asco.org/opening-session-speaker-dr-michael-e-porter-discusses-current-state-future-directions-value-based

“Value is outcomes relative to cost. Outcomes are the actual results of care, across the multiple dimensions that matter for patients. We need to measure outcomes, not just compliance with evidence-based guidelines or patient satisfaction. A big problem in health care has been that quality is often defined as ‘Did we go through a good process?’ rather than ‘Did we achieve a good result?’

In order to properly measure outcomes, the focus must be on clinical conditions, not specialties, procedures, or sites of care. You can’t measure outcomes for ‘cancer’ because every cancer is different and involves different clinical and functional issues. We introduced the concept of the outcome hierarchy to systematically identify the set of outcomes that matter to patients for a given condition. This thinking is starting to spread rapidly across fields and countries.”

“The Naked Surgeon” author Samer Nashef

Focus on health outcomes look beyond the processes.

“one could easily argue that if doctors do not know what they are trying to achieve, have no way of measuring whether it has been achieved, and no idea if the achoievement is good enough, then what on Earth are they doing in medicine? “

“The solution is to ask a few basic questions

  1. What is the service trying to achieve
  2. Is there a reliable way of measuring that achievement?
  3. Is there an acceptable to aim for? “

From “The Naked Surgeon” author Samer Nashef

the link to the book

Driving our health journey – writing the story

this is a quote from Health Hats post

“Health data is big business and very personal. The voice of the people at the center of care is critical.  I attended my first weekly hour-long meeting. While much of it was technical and over my head, I joined because someone asked about patient goals. I’ve never heard techie’s speaking about patient goals. To me that’s, What am I, are we, trying to accomplish on my health journey?  Certainly end-of-life choices is one, but more often it’s less pain, less fear, more fun, managing my meds, hanging with friends and family, fitting in my clothes, getting to work, getting to the doctor, having love in my life. I think I’ve died and gone to heaven.”

The Link